Every journey begins with that first step! NAMIWalks is proud to be the largest and most successful mental illness awareness event in America! Through NAMIWalks' public, active display of support for people affected by mental illness, we are changing our American communities and ensuring that help and hope are available for those in need. NAMIWALK WASHINGTON State is scheduled for May 17th. 

Every affiliate is expected to find its own funding. The funds from the WALK are used to support NAMI Eastside services in our East King County communities.

Keep in mind that the NAMIWalk is a fundraiser, not a pledge per mile. You could walk by yourself or not walk at all. You may collect donations without being a walker. Planning a garage sale or other event? Contact the NES office for assistance.

The walk is designed to make it easy for affiliates to raise money. The State office raises sponsorship money to cover the costs of the walk, so a very high percentage of the donations go directly into the coffers of the local affiliate.

Just follow these simple steps:

• Register as a Team Captain online at www.namiwalks.org/Washington.

Be sure to indicate NAMI Eastside as your affiliate. Money that is not directed at a specific affiliate will go to NAMI Washington.

• Make or collect your first donation (Minimum $30 to qualify)

• RSVP to the Team Captain Kick-Off Event by March 29, 2014

• Attend the Kick-Off Event from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. on Thursday April 3, 2014 at NAVOS

Raising money online for a good cause is quite a bit easier - and lots more gratifying - than you might imagine.

We will have additional prizes along the way to spur you on, and anyone who raises at least $50 online will be eligible to win. So let's get going. And let's have fun!


***Time limits for involuntary-commitment evaluations:


Brian M. Rosenthal, staff reporter for The Seattle Times, as asked for our help once again. “I’m writing a story about a little-known state law that sets a time limit for county designated mental health professionals to conduct evaluations for potential involuntary detention. The limit varies depending on where the evaluation takes place, but is typically six hours or 12 hours (this law is commonly called the “6-hour rule”). If the deadline is not met, the subject is NOT immediately released but can be ordered released by a judge at the hearing for a potential 14-day commitment – even if everybody agrees they are in need of treatment.

I’ve heard that DMHPs are having a harder time meeting the deadline as detentions increase and county resources remain flat, and that as a result more people are getting released. That is, it’s a legal technicality denying treatment to people who need it. I’m looking for anybody who may know anything about this, but especially any family members who have had a loved one released because of this technicality. They may not even know why their loved one was released, but maybe they know they were released because of a technicality. That would be helpful too.”

Brian M. Rosenthal, Staff reporter | The Seattle Times, o: (206) 464-3195 | c: (765) 586-1702www.twitter.com/brianmrosenthal


PLEASE CONTACT BRIAN IF YOU HAVE ANY INFORMATION ON THIS IMPORTANT TOPIC.

“Leaving No Stone Unturned In The Quest To Cure Mental Illness”


Guests: Ace Bulger & Sharon Simas
Date: Tuesday, April 15, 2014, 7 PM - 9 PM
Location: Evergreen Hospital, Suite Tan 100,
12303 NE 130th Lane,
Kirkland, WA

In the quest to help their daughters with mental illness, two parents will share stories that are strikingly similar, but with very different outcomes. On one hand, a precious young life lost, on the other, a cure. Both families did everything they knew how, sought and listened to authorities, and made valiant efforts to save their children. What did they do differently? The answer lay in getting to the underlying biological causes of brain dysfunction through lab testing and providing the body with the ingredients needed for the brain to heal. They will share lessons learned in finding treatment and dealing with doctors, schools, and insurance companies.

Theirs is a message of hope and strategy for others who face the real and difficult issues of mental illness. 

Ace Bulger is a typical father of three daughters. He spent over 25 years in education as a principal, vice-principal, athletic director and teacher, 14 years as a certified coach working with school districts, organizations, families and individuals. Motivated in part by the suicide of one of his daughters, Ace became a student of epigenetics, nutrition, and overall wellness in order to help educate families and individuals as to the possibilities as well as difficulties of approaching mental health treatment in a truly comprehensive manner.  

Sharon Simas is a certified nutrition coach, and an experienced mom with 2 grown daughters. She’s volunteered extensively in the community, serving as PTA President and co-chair of a school district-wide Health and Wellness committee, as well as president/board member of several non-profit organizations. For over 5 years, Sharon has been researching the brain, epigenetics, and biochemistry, seeking out effective treatments to help close family members with serious mental illness, Parkinson's, stroke, and Asperger’s syndrome.

Please join us for this FREE educational event.

If you are interested in becoming a Connection Recovery Support Group facilitator, it is not too late to sign up. Please contact the NES office right away. To qualify for the training, you must have a mental illness, have attended one of our existing groups and have the recommendation of at least two facilitators.

Training calendar for 2014


• Connection April 18 – 20 Aberdeen, WA

• BASICS July TBD TBD

• Peer to Peer September 13 – 14 Snohomish County

• In Our Own Voice October TBD TBD


Applications may be submitted at any time.

Some classes have pre-requisites. Contact the NAMI Eastside office for more information.



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EDUCATION COMMITTEE NEWS

In 2013

· Trained 32 teachers to in three different education programs.

· Trained 30 facilitators in two different support programs.

· Held trainings in 5 signature programs

An Educational Forum On: 
Leaving No Stone Unturned in the Quest to Cure Mental Illness


Date: Tuesday, March 18, 2014, 7 PM - 9 PM

Location: Evergreen Hospital, Suite Tan 100,
                 12303 NE 130th Lane, Kirkland, WA

In the quest to help their daughters with mental illness, two parents will share stories that are strikingly similar, but with very different outcomes. On one hand, a precious young life lost, on the other, a cure. Both families did everything they knew how, sought and listened to authorities, and made valiant efforts to save their children. What did they do differently? What led to a cure? The answer lay in getting to the underlying biological causes of brain dysfunction through lab testing and providing the body with the ingredients needed for the brain to heal. They will share lessons learned in finding treatment and dealing with doctors, schools, and insurance companies.

Theirs is a message of hope and strategy for others who face the real and difficult issues of mental illness. They are serious about helping others navigate the murky waters of mental health care with an emphasis on implementing a comprehensive, integrated approach of treatment.

Ace Bulger is a financial planner, and a typical father of three daughters. He spent over 25 years in education as a principal, vice-principal, athletic director, teacher, coach, as well as over 14 years as a certified coach working with school districts, organizations, families and individuals. Motivated in part by the suicide of one of his daughters, Ace became a student of epigenetics, nutrition, and overall wellness in order to help educate families and individuals as to the possibilities as well as difficulties of approaching mental health treatment in a truly comprehensive manner. For the past year he has been representing NAMI on the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction’s task force to implement House Bill 1336, which passed last July to address suicide prevention in schools. Ace is also on the NAMI Eastside Public Policy Committee focusing on legislation relevant to improving our mental health system.

Sharon Simas is a certified nutrition coach, and an experienced mom with 2 grown daughters. Her college education gave her a strong technical and science background, and she spent 15 years as a computer systems analyst. She’s volunteered extensively in the community, serving as PTA President and co-chair of a school district-wide Health and Wellness committee, as well as president/board member of several non-profit organizations. Sharon has been honored as a PTSA Golden Acorn recipient and Outstanding Youth Advocate, as well as YMCA Volunteer of the Year. For over 5 years, Sharon has been researching the brain, epigenetics, and biochemistry, seeking out effective treatments to help close family members with serious mental illness, Parkinson's, stroke, and Asperger’s syndrome. What she found was surprising and permanently changed her family.

Please join us for this FREE educational event.



This year’s NAMIWalk WA will take place on Saturday May 17, beginning and ending at Marina Park in Kirkland. The route will follow the shores of Lake Washington between 9:30 and 11:00am.

The walk is the primary fundraising event for NAMI Washington and the state's 23 National Alliance on Mental Illness affiliates. The event also serves to promote mental health awareness and remind people that NAMI exists across Washington to help individuals with mental illness and their families.

The Walk’s goal is to raise $275,000 to help the NAMI chapters across Washington continue to offer free classes, support groups, information and referral to places of assistance.

Please join us by walking, cheering on our walkers and lending your financial support. 

For More Information, or to register, go to 

Phone: 425-985-0208.

*****

NAVOS in Burien will host the upcoming NAMIWalk Kick-off luncheon for sponsors and team captains. The Kick off date has been changed to Thursday, April 3, 2014, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. There will be a catered lunch. More information will be available shortly and RSVP’s will be required

We hope that by this time you have formed your teams and have started raising money. The key to a successful WALK is teams. If you have thought about forming one in the past, now is the time to do it. Still not sure? Join a team and support your local affiliate, NAMI Eastside.



STARTS JANUARY 28TH: Family Support Group #1, 4th Tuesday, 7pm-8:30pm, Mary, Queen of Peace Parish, 1121 228th Ave Se, in the C126/St. Martin de Porres Conference Room, Sammamish, WA 98075. Contact Cathy at mcathywilliams@comcast.net.

Family Support Group #2, 3rd Wednesday, 7pm-8:30pm Fairfax Hospital, in the Boardroom, 10200 NE 132nd St., Kirkland, Dinah Aldrich (206) 240-2315, aldrich.nami@comcast.net. ***This group will end in March

Family Support Group #3, 1st Tuesday, 7pm-8:30pm Fairfax Hospital, in the Boardroom, 10200 NE 132nd St., Kirkland, Karla (206) 227-7430 or dokawood@comcast.net

Family Support Group #4, 3rd Wednesday, 7pm-8:30pm, St. Andrews Lutheran Church, Room 1E1, 2650 148th Ave SE, Bellevue, Karin (425) 915-6682, millerkarin2@gmail.com or Kate at katehallman@gmail.com

Family Support Group #5, 4th Thursday, 7pm-8:30pm, Washington Cathedral Church, 12300 Woodinville-Redmond Rd. NE, Redmond, Karla (206) 227-7430 or dokawood@comcast.net

Family Support Group #6, 3rd Saturday, 12:30pm-2:00pm at Navos, 2600 SW Holden Street in West Seattle. Please check in at the front desk. Contact Dinah Aldrich at Aldrich.nami@comcast.net (206) 240-2315.

Family Support Group #7, last Thursday of each month, 7pm-8:30pm, the Unitarian Church at 12700 SE 32nd St. Bellevue, Contact Narima Amin 425-628-4082

Family Support Group #8, second Monday 7:00-8:30pm at Woodinville Unitarian Universalist Church, portable 1, 19020 NE Woodinville-Duvall Road, Woodinville. Contact Darlene at Darlene@planethays.com or Dyna Albright.

  SCANS REVEAL BRAIN DIFFERENCES IN CHILDREN WITH NONVERBAL LEARNING DISORDER
Using MRI scans Jodene Fine, PhD, associate professor, School of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan,  et al, found structural differences in the central nervous systems [CNS] of children diagnosed with nonverbal learning disorder [NVLD]; as reported in the November 12, 2013, online Child Neuropsychology.
Children with NVLD had significantly smaller parts of the CNS [e.g. splenium, a part of the corpus callosum] which connects and facilitates communication between the left and right brain hemispheres.
Children diagnosed with NVLD exhibit normal language skills, but tend to have difficulty understanding social cues, solving visual puzzles, and figuring out math problems.
Also, researchers recorded brain activity of the children while they watched videos of positive social interaction [e.g. a child receiving a present] and negative social interaction [e.g. a child being bullied].  Children with non-verbal learning disorder responded differently than those without Asperger’s Syndrome.  The difference seen may indicate different neural pathways underlying the conditions.
 This study seems to contradict the assumption that NVLD is linked to Asperger’s Syndrome or that it is, as some have called it, a “pseudo-diagnosis”.
Further studies are needed; there is still not enough evidence to say that NVLD is a distinct diagnosis.  However, this research supports the possibility that it might be.

Summary By:
Thomas N. Carter, M.D.
40 Lake Bellevue
Suite 100
Bellevue, WA 98005
Phone: 425-646-7666

NAMI Eastside - Support, Education, and Advocacy

  • One in four adults−approximately 61.5 million Americans−experience mental illness in a given year. One in 17−about 13.6 million−live with a serious mental illness such as schizophrenia, major depression or bipolar disorder
  • Approximately 20 percent of youth ages 13 to 18 experience severe mental disorders in a given year. For ages 8 to 15, the estimate is 13 percent
  • Approximately 1.1 percent of American adults—about 2.6 million people—live with schizophrenia.
  • Approximately 2.6 percent of American adults−6.1 million people−live with bipolar disorder.
  • Approximately 6.7 percent of American adults−about 14.8 million people−live with major depression.4,6
  • Approximately 18.1 percent of American adults−about 42 million people−live with anxiety disorders, such as panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), generalized anxiety disorder and phobias.
  • About 9.2 million adults have co-occurring mental health and addiction disorders.
  • Approximately 26 percent of homeless adults staying in shelters live with serious mental illness and an estimated 46 percent live with severe mental illness and/or substance use disorders.
  • Approximately 20percent of state prisoners and 21 percent of local jail prisoners have “a recent history” of a mental health condition.
  • Seventy percent of youth in juvenile justice systems have at least one mental health condition and at least 20 percent live with a severe mental illness.

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