NAMI Walk of Washington.

2014 Walk Update
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Thanks to the following businesses who have already committed to sponsoring our 2014 Walk:

Premiere Sponsor:
  • Fairfax Hospital

Gold Sponsors:
  • Schroeter, Goldmark & Bender
  • Recovery Innovations

Silver Sponsors:
  • Evergreen Health
  • Optum
  • PhRMA
  • UW Medicine
Kick-Off Luncheon Sponsor:
  • Navos
Start Finish Sponsors:
  • Amerigroup
  • Community Psychiatric Clinic
  • Compass Health
  • Comprehensive
  • Downtown Emergency Services Center
  • Molina Healthcare
  • Sound Mental Health
Bronze Sponsors:
  • Behavioral Health Resources
  • Genoa HealthcareJefferson Mental Health Services
  • Nystrom and Associates, Ltd.
  • Skagit Regional Health
  • Snoqualmie Valley Hospital District
  • Sunovion
  • Swedish Medical Center
  • Telecare Corporation
  • Washington State Hospital Association
Supporters:
  • Anderson Hunter Law Firm
  • Catholic Family and Child Services
  • Community House Mental Health Agency
  • Dogwise Publishing Acquisitions
  • Eastside Therapeutic Resource
  • Eli Lilly
  • GFWC South King Count Woman's Club
  • Greater Lakes Mental Healthcare
  • Kiwanis Club of Monroe
  • Multicare
  • Overlake Medical Center
  • Providence St. Peter Hospital
  • Transitional Resources

THANK YOU!  We could not do this without our sponsors!



 
WHY SHOULD YOU WALK?

Annie Koch and her brother Johnny

WHY I WALK

If you love someone who struggles with severe mental illness - or love someone who loves someone who struggles with severe mental illness - think  about supporting the NAMI Walk of Washington.

It's one of the best ways to help the National Alliance on Mental Illness, an extraordinary organization, which does so much for people with schizophrenia, bipolar disease, serious depression and other brain disorders. NAMI is remarkable in that it also gives enormous help to the family members of these people:  Parents, siblings, children and partners suffer alongside the people they love.

I began supporting the NAMI Walk of Washington in 2003, the year Paul Schiavo and I started a monthly support group in Seattle for family members of those suffering from severe mental illness. Over the years, I've led Walk teams and, in 2011, I was very happy to help organize the annual event. In 2012, I managed the Walk and we raised $206,000.

Those funds were distributed to the 23 NAMI affiliates around the state to help pay for the services and programs the national nonprofit offers.

Ever taken Family-to-Family, a 12-week NAMI program offering invaluable help to family members? Or Peer-to-Peer, an eight-week course helping those with severe mental illness navigate the difficult road to recovery? The classes are free and money raised by the walk helps pay the cost of instructor training and course materials. 

Walk money also goes toward running the small, mostly volunteer NAMI offices across Washington. Workers steer walk-ins and callers to the right services and support groups. They organize NAMI volunteers to go to schools and into the community to educate students and the public about severe mental illness and how best to help.

I got involved with NAMI more than 10 years ago because one of my brothers has struggled with severe mental illness since he was 19. He's now 53. Since 2002, when I first discovered NAMI, the organization has provided me with emotional support and knowledge.

In turn, I have come to understand more fully my brother's plight and have become his strong advocate. During this past year, my support helped lead to an important discovery about his illness and now, for the first time in years, my brother and our family have hope. I owe NAMI a lot, particularly for its philosophy of never giving up. I support the NAMI Walk of Washington and I hope you will, too.


Annie Koch

EVENT PHOTOGRAPHER NEEDED
EVENT PHOTOGRAPHER NEEDED  
FOR WALKDAY

We could use a professional photographer to take pictures on Walk day.  If you know of anyone that would be willing to do an in-kind donation and take pictures that day, please email walk@namiwa.org


  
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SHARE US ON FACEBOOK
DIDN'T YOUR MOM ALWAYS TELL YOU TO SHARE?


Well, we need you to share!  Please share all of our Facebook posts on your own Facebook page.  How is it possible that we have 1000+ walkers but only 438 Likes?  Help us to spread the word--FACEBOOK is the easiest, cheapest and fastest way to get the information about NAMI Walk out there! And, if you haven't liked us yet, then click on the facebook link below.
 
 
                                       CONGRATULATIONS
                   
. . . and thank you to these leading fundraisers:

Top Individual Fundraisers
1. Jim and Becky Moats              $1,709.00
2. Shari Shovlin                          $1,145.00
3. Trez Buckland                        $1,100.00
4. Mark Soine                            $1,095.00
 5. Lucy Woodworth                         $1050.00    
  
Top Fundraising Teams 
1. Paula's Purple People              $3,695.00
          2.Snohomish Stigma Stompers      $2,230.00         
3. NAMI Greater Seattle                               
Family to Family Grads                 $2,180.00
4. UW Medicine                              $1,910.00
 5.  The Moats Family                           $1,709.00 
  
SAVE THE DATE:  
SATURDAY MAY 17, 2014

The tenth annual NAMI Walk of Washington will take place on Saturday, May 17.

For the fourth year, the walk will be held at Marina Park in the Seattle suburb of Kirkland, and the route will follow the scenic shoreline of Lake Washington. The lovely location, a popular area for pedestrians and a well-traveled route for vehicles, brings needed visibility to the event.

The walk is the primary fundraising event for NAMI Washington and the state's 23 National Alliance on Mental Illness affiliates. The event also serves to promote mental health awareness and remind people that NAMI exists across Washington to help individuals with mental illness and their families.

This year walk goal is to raise $275,000 to help the NAMI affiliates across Washington continue to offer free classes, support groups, information and referral to places of assistance.

As usual, the event will include sponsor booths, prizes, free food and music.

Last year's event attracted over 1,000 walkers.
PASS IT ON!
 Forward this to anyone you think wants to get involved in NAMIWalks!

Questions?

Gazala Uradnik
, NAMI Washington Walk Manager
walk@namiwa.org

“Leaving No Stone Unturned In The Quest To Cure Mental Illness”


Guests: Ace Bulger & Sharon Simas
Date: Tuesday, April 15, 2014, 7 PM - 9 PM
Location: Evergreen Hospital, Suite Tan 100,
12303 NE 130th Lane,
Kirkland, WA

In the quest to help their daughters with mental illness, two parents will share stories that are strikingly similar, but with very different outcomes. On one hand, a precious young life lost, on the other, a cure. Both families did everything they knew how, sought and listened to authorities, and made valiant efforts to save their children. What did they do differently? The answer lay in getting to the underlying biological causes of brain dysfunction through lab testing and providing the body with the ingredients needed for the brain to heal. They will share lessons learned in finding treatment and dealing with doctors, schools, and insurance companies.

Theirs is a message of hope and strategy for others who face the real and difficult issues of mental illness. 

Ace Bulger is a typical father of three daughters. He spent over 25 years in education as a principal, vice-principal, athletic director and teacher, 14 years as a certified coach working with school districts, organizations, families and individuals. Motivated in part by the suicide of one of his daughters, Ace became a student of epigenetics, nutrition, and overall wellness in order to help educate families and individuals as to the possibilities as well as difficulties of approaching mental health treatment in a truly comprehensive manner.  

Sharon Simas is a certified nutrition coach, and an experienced mom with 2 grown daughters. She’s volunteered extensively in the community, serving as PTA President and co-chair of a school district-wide Health and Wellness committee, as well as president/board member of several non-profit organizations. For over 5 years, Sharon has been researching the brain, epigenetics, and biochemistry, seeking out effective treatments to help close family members with serious mental illness, Parkinson's, stroke, and Asperger’s syndrome.

Please join us for this FREE educational event.

If you are interested in becoming a Connection Recovery Support Group facilitator, it is not too late to sign up. Please contact the NES office right away. To qualify for the training, you must have a mental illness, have attended one of our existing groups and have the recommendation of at least two facilitators.

Training calendar for 2014


• Connection April 18 – 20 Aberdeen, WA

• BASICS July TBD TBD

• Peer to Peer September 13 – 14 Snohomish County

• In Our Own Voice October TBD TBD


Applications may be submitted at any time.

Some classes have pre-requisites. Contact the NAMI Eastside office for more information.



***********************************************


EDUCATION COMMITTEE NEWS

In 2013

· Trained 32 teachers to in three different education programs.

· Trained 30 facilitators in two different support programs.

· Held trainings in 5 signature programs

An Educational Forum On: 
Leaving No Stone Unturned in the Quest to Cure Mental Illness


Date: Tuesday, March 18, 2014, 7 PM - 9 PM

Location: Evergreen Hospital, Suite Tan 100,
                 12303 NE 130th Lane, Kirkland, WA

In the quest to help their daughters with mental illness, two parents will share stories that are strikingly similar, but with very different outcomes. On one hand, a precious young life lost, on the other, a cure. Both families did everything they knew how, sought and listened to authorities, and made valiant efforts to save their children. What did they do differently? What led to a cure? The answer lay in getting to the underlying biological causes of brain dysfunction through lab testing and providing the body with the ingredients needed for the brain to heal. They will share lessons learned in finding treatment and dealing with doctors, schools, and insurance companies.

Theirs is a message of hope and strategy for others who face the real and difficult issues of mental illness. They are serious about helping others navigate the murky waters of mental health care with an emphasis on implementing a comprehensive, integrated approach of treatment.

Ace Bulger is a financial planner, and a typical father of three daughters. He spent over 25 years in education as a principal, vice-principal, athletic director, teacher, coach, as well as over 14 years as a certified coach working with school districts, organizations, families and individuals. Motivated in part by the suicide of one of his daughters, Ace became a student of epigenetics, nutrition, and overall wellness in order to help educate families and individuals as to the possibilities as well as difficulties of approaching mental health treatment in a truly comprehensive manner. For the past year he has been representing NAMI on the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction’s task force to implement House Bill 1336, which passed last July to address suicide prevention in schools. Ace is also on the NAMI Eastside Public Policy Committee focusing on legislation relevant to improving our mental health system.

Sharon Simas is a certified nutrition coach, and an experienced mom with 2 grown daughters. Her college education gave her a strong technical and science background, and she spent 15 years as a computer systems analyst. She’s volunteered extensively in the community, serving as PTA President and co-chair of a school district-wide Health and Wellness committee, as well as president/board member of several non-profit organizations. Sharon has been honored as a PTSA Golden Acorn recipient and Outstanding Youth Advocate, as well as YMCA Volunteer of the Year. For over 5 years, Sharon has been researching the brain, epigenetics, and biochemistry, seeking out effective treatments to help close family members with serious mental illness, Parkinson's, stroke, and Asperger’s syndrome. What she found was surprising and permanently changed her family.

Please join us for this FREE educational event.


STARTS JANUARY 28TH: Family Support Group #1, 4th Tuesday, 7pm-8:30pm, Mary, Queen of Peace Parish, 1121 228th Ave Se, in the C126/St. Martin de Porres Conference Room, Sammamish, WA 98075. Contact Cathy at mcathywilliams@comcast.net.

Family Support Group #2, 3rd Wednesday, 7pm-8:30pm Fairfax Hospital, in the Boardroom, 10200 NE 132nd St., Kirkland, Dinah Aldrich (206) 240-2315, aldrich.nami@comcast.net. ***This group will end in March

Family Support Group #3, 1st Tuesday, 7pm-8:30pm Fairfax Hospital, in the Boardroom, 10200 NE 132nd St., Kirkland, Karla (206) 227-7430 or dokawood@comcast.net

Family Support Group #4, 3rd Wednesday, 7pm-8:30pm, St. Andrews Lutheran Church, Room 1E1, 2650 148th Ave SE, Bellevue, Karin (425) 915-6682, millerkarin2@gmail.com or Kate at katehallman@gmail.com

Family Support Group #5, 4th Thursday, 7pm-8:30pm, Washington Cathedral Church, 12300 Woodinville-Redmond Rd. NE, Redmond, Karla (206) 227-7430 or dokawood@comcast.net

Family Support Group #6, 3rd Saturday, 12:30pm-2:00pm at Navos, 2600 SW Holden Street in West Seattle. Please check in at the front desk. Contact Dinah Aldrich at Aldrich.nami@comcast.net (206) 240-2315.

Family Support Group #7, last Thursday of each month, 7pm-8:30pm, the Unitarian Church at 12700 SE 32nd St. Bellevue, Contact Narima Amin 425-628-4082

Family Support Group #8, second Monday 7:00-8:30pm at Woodinville Unitarian Universalist Church, portable 1, 19020 NE Woodinville-Duvall Road, Woodinville. Contact Darlene at Darlene@planethays.com or Dyna Albright.

  SCANS REVEAL BRAIN DIFFERENCES IN CHILDREN WITH NONVERBAL LEARNING DISORDER
Using MRI scans Jodene Fine, PhD, associate professor, School of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan,  et al, found structural differences in the central nervous systems [CNS] of children diagnosed with nonverbal learning disorder [NVLD]; as reported in the November 12, 2013, online Child Neuropsychology.
Children with NVLD had significantly smaller parts of the CNS [e.g. splenium, a part of the corpus callosum] which connects and facilitates communication between the left and right brain hemispheres.
Children diagnosed with NVLD exhibit normal language skills, but tend to have difficulty understanding social cues, solving visual puzzles, and figuring out math problems.
Also, researchers recorded brain activity of the children while they watched videos of positive social interaction [e.g. a child receiving a present] and negative social interaction [e.g. a child being bullied].  Children with non-verbal learning disorder responded differently than those without Asperger’s Syndrome.  The difference seen may indicate different neural pathways underlying the conditions.
 This study seems to contradict the assumption that NVLD is linked to Asperger’s Syndrome or that it is, as some have called it, a “pseudo-diagnosis”.
Further studies are needed; there is still not enough evidence to say that NVLD is a distinct diagnosis.  However, this research supports the possibility that it might be.

Summary By:
Thomas N. Carter, M.D.
40 Lake Bellevue
Suite 100
Bellevue, WA 98005
Phone: 425-646-7666

NAMI Eastside - Support, Education, and Advocacy

  • One in four adults−approximately 61.5 million Americans−experience mental illness in a given year. One in 17−about 13.6 million−live with a serious mental illness such as schizophrenia, major depression or bipolar disorder
  • Approximately 20 percent of youth ages 13 to 18 experience severe mental disorders in a given year. For ages 8 to 15, the estimate is 13 percent
  • Approximately 1.1 percent of American adults—about 2.6 million people—live with schizophrenia.
  • Approximately 2.6 percent of American adults−6.1 million people−live with bipolar disorder.
  • Approximately 6.7 percent of American adults−about 14.8 million people−live with major depression.4,6
  • Approximately 18.1 percent of American adults−about 42 million people−live with anxiety disorders, such as panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), generalized anxiety disorder and phobias.
  • About 9.2 million adults have co-occurring mental health and addiction disorders.
  • Approximately 26 percent of homeless adults staying in shelters live with serious mental illness and an estimated 46 percent live with severe mental illness and/or substance use disorders.
  • Approximately 20percent of state prisoners and 21 percent of local jail prisoners have “a recent history” of a mental health condition.
  • Seventy percent of youth in juvenile justice systems have at least one mental health condition and at least 20 percent live with a severe mental illness.
NAMI Eastside - Support, Education, and Advocacy...

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